Tag Archives: ARM

Association of Radical Midwives monthly discussion group.

This is a local group for the support of peaceful pregnancy, birth and parenting. Hosted by Joy Horner, radical midwife, mum, lecturer and some day writer. Inspired by the Freedom For Birth film I am determined to impart information about human rights in childbirth, facilitate discussions, and to support women on their journeys to parenthood. You don’t have to be a midwife, a radical, or a female to attend. All those with an interested in women’s rights and experiences in pregnancy and childbirth are welcomed. These stimulating monthly discussion groups are designed to encourage experience sharing and debate, accompanied by tea and cake. All welcome. Donations for refreshments welcomed as 50% given to local charity Towards Tomorrow Together.

2013 Meetings at my house 7:30pm-9:30pm:

Thursday 8th August – Birth rights and choices.

Tuessday 3rd September – Waterbirth evening.

Thursday 3rd October – Postponed due to midwifery commitments.

Thursday 7th November – Am I allowed? how to get the best from your pregnancy, birth and postnatal care experiences.

Thursday 5th December – Blissful, ecstatic or orgasmic birth?

Please phone or text 07939247462 prior to attending the meeting to confirm date and location details. I am a practicing midwife so there is a chance I would have to reschedule a meeting if attending a birth.

Please note that although children are welcome they are your responsibility at all times, as I do have free-roaming teenagers, lurcher and elderly cats.

The Association of Radical Midwives are midwives, student midwives and others in the UK committed to improving the maternity care provided by the NHS. We strongly believe that all women have the right to a service tailored more closely to their needs, and a sympathetic attitude on the part of their professional attendants.

We are primarily a support group for people having difficulty in getting or giving  sympathetic, personalised midwifery care, and those who wish to provide good care. A few of us are working independently outside the NHS, in order to offer a more woman-centred,one-to-one, style of practice, which at present is not widely available within NHS maternity services.

In the mid 70s, the majority of pregnant women in UK had labour induced by artificial rupture of membranes (ARM) around the date they were “due”. These initials were used when the group needed a name, using the dictionary definition of “radical”, (roots, origins, basics, etc.) which aptly described the basic midwifery skills which they hoped to revive.

Held in our homes in Somerset, the group meet monthly to share skills and knowlege to empower women to have the best possible maternity care experience. Phone me or e-mail me at joy@birthjoy.co.uk for details of the next meeting.

Freedom For Birth Film Premier

FREEDOM FOR BIRTH – GLOBAL FILM LAUNCH

GIVES BIRTH TO THE  MOTHER’S REVOLUTION

Glastonbury film premier on Thursday 20th September 2012. was a resounding success! we filled 40 seats and had people sitting on the floor! £100 each was raised for The red tent project and The White ribbon Alliance, A lively discussion followed lead by our panel of experts Jenn Hodge (doula and service user), Kate Woods (doula and doula trainer), Eleanor Copp (midwife and hypnotherapist), and myself Joy Horner.

We watched the new documentary that reframes childbirth as the most pressing global Human Rights issue today is launching with hundreds of premieres all over the world on the same day, Thursday 20th September.

Freedom For Birth is a 60 minute campaigning documentary featuring a Who’s Who of leading birth experts and international Human Rights lawyers all calling for radical change
to the world’s maternity systems.

Hermine Hayes-Klein, US lawyer and organiser of the recent Human Rights in Childbirth Conference at the Hague, the Netherlands says, “the way that childbirth is being managed in many countries around the world is deeply problematic. Millions of pregnant women are pushed into hospitals, pushed onto their back and cut open. They are subject to unnecessary pharmaceutical and surgical interventions that their care providers openly
admit to imposing on them for reasons of finance and convenience. Women around the world are waking up to the fact that childbirth doesn’t have to be like this and it shouldn’t. Disrespect and abuse are not the necessary price of safety”.

Made by British filmmakers Toni Harman and Alex Wakeford, Freedom For Birth film tells the story of an Hungarian midwife Agnes Gereb who has been jailed for supporting women giving birth at home. One of the home birth mothers supported by Ms Gereb decided to take a stand.

When pregnant with her second child, Anna Ternovsky took her country to the European Court of Human Rights and won a landmark case that has major implications for childbirth around the world.

Toni Harman, one of the filmmakers says, “the Ternovsky vs Hungary ruling at the European Court of Human Rights in 2010 means that now in Europe, every birthing woman has the legal right to decide where and how she gives birth. And across the world, it means that if a woman feels like her Human Rights are being violated because her birth choices are not being fully supported, she could use the power of the law to protect those rights. With the release of “Freedom For Birth”, we hope millions of women become aware
of their legal rights and so our film has the potential to spark a revolution in maternity care across the world. In fact, we are calling this the Mothers’ Revolution.”

Ms. Hayes-Klein concludes, “Freedom For Birth” holds the answer to changing the system. Birth will change when women realise they have a right to meaningful support for childbirth and claim that right. Birth will change when women stand up against the abuses that are currently suffered in such high numbers and say, No More.”

A local screening of Freedom For Birth will take place at:

Glastonbury Town Hall, Magdelene street, Glastonbury,
Somerset. BA6 9EL www.glastonbury.gov.uk

On 20th September at 7-9pm

Tickets £4 in advance or £5 on the door (concessions available). All profits to the local Red Tent Project and The White Ribbon Alliance charity.

With after film discussion with panel of local
experts including midwives, doulas and service users.

Organised by local midwife and birth advocate Joy Horner.

Freedom for birth film ticket

 

Additional information about Freedom For Birth can be found on the website: http://freedomforbirth.com

The filmmakers are aiming for 1,000 screenings happening across the world on Thursday 20th September, 2012. The countries with confirmed screenings include the UK, Germany, France, Denmark, Spain, Greece, Italy, Norway, the Netherlands, Austria, Poland, Croatia,
Slovenia, Slovakia, Belgium, Hungary, Israel, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Russia, Iceland, USA, Canada, Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, Australia, Malaysia and New Zealand.

Each screening is being organised by local birth campaigners.

The film has been selected for screening in the Cambridge Film Festival on 20th September. http://www.cambridgefilmfestival.org.uk/

Toni Harman and Alex Wakeford are a filmmaking couple who have set up a cross-media global film project called One World Birth to provide educational videos featuring the world’s leading birth experts  http://oneworldbirth.net

Freedom For Birth is Harman and Wakeford’s third documentary film about birth. They were inspired to make films about following their own difficult birth of their daughter four years ago. A cascade of interventions in their birth led to an emergency
caesarean section.

Contact Information:

Toni Harman, Producer/Director, Freedom For Birth info@altofilms.com +44 (0) 1273 747837 Website: http://freedomforbirth.com

High resolution still images available on request.


“Am I allowed?”

A woman this week asked me one of the things that make me want to get on my soapbox about assertiveness and women’s rights.  What she said was “are you allowed to give birth to a breech baby?” My response, as ever, to this type of question is “it you who allows or disallows your care providers to do anything to you or your baby. Nothing can be done to you or your baby at home or in a hospital setting, without your consent. You are a mentally competent adult making rational decisions about your care, and you, more than anyone, has the best interests of your baby at the foremost in your mind”.

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), that govern all practicing midwives, provide information to midwives and nurses on the issue of consent:

“Legally, a competent adult can either give or refuse consent to treatment, even if that refusal may result in harm or death to him or herself. Nurses and midwives must respect their refusal just as much as they would their consent”.

The problem may lie with the allocation of power and responsibility in maternity care. Midwives and doctors are in a uniquely privileged position to be able to serve women at such a vulnerable time in their lives. We train long and hard to amass knowledge to help those we care for, but we should not use this to control or coerce women into what we think they should do. We are after all “Professional Servants” (Mary Cronk). We are there to serve the families we care for, but it is also our professional duty to inform them of any risks associated with their choices. The Nursing and Midwifery council (which regulates all midwives and nurses) has rules and codes of conduct advising us how to support our clients such as:

1. You must treat people as individuals and respect their dignity

2. You must not discriminate in any way against those in your care

3. You must treat people kindly and considerately

4. You must act as an advocate for those in your care, helping them to access relevant health and social care, information and support

5. You must respect people’s right to confidentiality.

6. You must ensure people are informed about how and why information is shared by those who will be providing their care.

7. You must disclose information if you believe someone may be at risk of harm, in line with the law of the country in which you are practising.

8. You must listen to the people in your care and respond to their concerns and preferences.

9. You must support people in caring for themselves to improve and maintain their health

10. You must recognise and respect the contribution that people make to their own care and wellbeing.

11. You must make arrangements to meet people’s language and communication needs.

12. You must share with people, in a way they can understand, the information they want or need to know about their health.

Point number 2 was obviously not read or understood by midwives who attended a woman’s home birth. The woman was from a particular religious group and her partner was from a different ethnic group. The woman phoned me as a result of midwife harassment in her current pregnancy, and in telling me her previous birth experiences said the midwives at one of her previous births had made racist remarks! I was livid and asked if she had complained – no she hadn’t! this is so wrong on so many levels I don’t know where to start! Harassing heavily pregnant women, and going against their wishes in labour is not acceptable but racism from a so called professional is a disciplinary offence. I gave the woman information and advice to make written complaints about current and previous problems, and gave her AIMS contact details.

Another part of our rules concerns consent:

13. You must ensure that you gain consent before you begin any treatment or care.

14. You must respect and support people’s rights to accept or decline treatment and care.

15. You must uphold people’s rights to be fully involved in decisions about their care. 

16. You must be aware of the legislation regarding mental capacity, ensuring that people who lack capacity remain at the centre of decision making and are fully safeguarded.

17. You must be able to demonstrate that you have acted in someone’s best interests if you have provided care in an emergency.

Whether your care provider will like or dislike your choices should be no concern of yours. I personally don’t like junk food, but understand that some people know the risks of consuming it, and still chose to do so. I may offer education about the risks, but wouldn’t dream of telling people not to do it just because I don’t like it myself. This applies to many areas of midwifery care, for example if you are told you are not allowed to give birth at home it would be good to ask if there are specific risks you need to be aware of, before thanking your health professional for their opinion, informing them that you will consider what they’ve said very carefully and let them know you will let them know your decision in due course (Taken from Mary Cronk’s assertiveness phrases). Consider how your care provider would actually be able to force you to do anything against your will (sadly, women have informed me of social services being used as a threat in some circumstances!).

REMEMBER: You do not have to ask permission to do anything which concerns your own body or your baby. Politely question your caregivers, do your own research then take responsibility for your choices! Your body, your baby, your choice!

See also:

Mary Cronk’s assertiveness comments on Angela Horn’s great homebirth website

AIMS the Association for the Improvement in Marternity Services has a great website and provides telephone support for anyone having trouble finding good maternity care. Please consider becoming a member or making a donation to their good work. x

All rights reserved. Copyright Birth Joy 2011 (C)


Delayed cord clamping is a much kinder transition for the newborn baby

Cutting the baby’s umbilical cord is a ritual repeated unthinkingly by many doctors and midwives every day. Please educate yourself about the potential harm that could be caused for the baby by doing this.

In the 1980’s I was taught to feel for the umbilical cord around the baby’s neck, once the head was born, and to cut it if it was tight to facilitate delivery. I realise there were so many things wrong with this practice now. What if we cut a cord and then have a shoulder dystocia? We have effectively cut the baby’s lifeline. I don’t think many practitioners do this now. I certainly do not feel for nuchal cords as babies can be born, even when the cord is tight. The somersault manouver  can be used to keep baby close to the mother whilst the cord is untangled.

The brilliant midwife thinking blog highlights the dangers of premature cord clamping if a baby needs help to start breathing. Basically when the baby is born a significant amount of his blood is still in the placenta. After birth that blood is needed to perfuse the baby’s respiritory system, enabling him to transition to breathing air for the first time. If a baby is slow to breathe but has a good heatbeat he is still receiving oxygenated blood through his cord if it remains intact.

Some women like to keep the cord intact in the form of a lotus birth. Aida’s birth and lotus birth was filmed, and illustrates how not cutting the baby’s cord helps when her baby needs help to start breathing.

Here is a 7 minute film with good, common sense advice about not cutting baby’s cord immediately after birth. This film has brief images of a woman’s breast and nipple as she is with her newborn baby as his cord is cut and as he crawls to the breast to self-attachment. This process, called Self-Attachment and/or Breast Crawl is becoming known now as a very critical part of human development that has been disrupted by modern, medicalized birth. Click to view: We can be much kinder

Penny Simkin gives a visual aid teaching session on the subject of how much of baby’s blood is still in the placenta if we cut the cord too soon after birth. here

Robim Lim explains the importance of not clamping or cutting a newborn’s umbilical cord here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwvRUrn0p90&feature=player_embedded