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Microbirth Premier film screening in Glastonbury

The Premier screening of Toni Harman’s new film will be shown globally on 20th September 2014.
Following the successful screening of her previous film “Freedom for Birth” last year, I am pleased to be able to share her new film in Glastonbury.

“Microbirth” is a new feature-length documentary looking at birth in a whole new way; through the lens of a microscope. Investigating the latest scientific research, the film reveals how we give birth impacts the lifelong health of our children and potentially could even affect the future of humanity.

View a trailer here: http://microbirth.com

Recent population studies have shown babies born by Caesarean have approximately a 20% increased risk of developing asthma, 20% increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes, a similar risk with obesity and slightly smaller increases in gastro-intestinal conditions like Crohn’s disease or celiac disease. All of these conditions are linked to the immune system.

“Microbirth” explores several possible plausible explanations. One hypothesis is that if normal vaginal birth is interfered with or bypassed completely because of Caesarean birth, this could alter the “seeding of the baby’s microbiome”, the critical transfer of bacteria from mother to baby at birth. Scientists suggest this could lead to the baby’s immune system not developing to its full potential. Another hypothesis is the actual process of vaginal birth, including the cocktail of hormones produced during labour, could profoundly affect the baby’s immune regulation and metabolism.

The film’s co-director Toni Harman says, “Caesarean Sections are essential and often are life-saving. However, up until now, no-one has really looked into the long-term impact. This emerging research is painting an alarming picture in terms of future health across populations. There may even be repercussions for the future of humanity. And yet, up until now, I don’t hear any alarm bells ringing.”

Join us on 20th September 2014

In Glastonbury Town Hall , Magdalene street, Glastonbury, BA6 9EL

From  7pm to 9pm for the film premier, followed by after film discussion.

Tickets £5. All proceeds will be donated to Towards tomorrow Together  Registered charity number 1151022.

Parking close by. Disabled access. Refreshments available.

Contact me for further details on 0799247462 or email joy@birthjoy.co.uk


Association of Radical Midwives monthly discussion group.

This is a local group for the support of peaceful pregnancy, birth and parenting. Hosted by Joy Horner, radical midwife, mum, lecturer and some day writer. Inspired by the Freedom For Birth film I am determined to impart information about human rights in childbirth, facilitate discussions, and to support women on their journeys to parenthood. You don’t have to be a midwife, a radical, or a female to attend. All those with an interested in women’s rights and experiences in pregnancy and childbirth are welcomed. These stimulating monthly discussion groups are designed to encourage experience sharing and debate, accompanied by tea and cake. All welcome. Donations for refreshments welcomed as 50% given to local charity Towards Tomorrow Together.

2013 Meetings at my house 7:30pm-9:30pm:

Thursday 8th August – Birth rights and choices.

Tuessday 3rd September – Waterbirth evening.

Thursday 3rd October – Postponed due to midwifery commitments.

Thursday 7th November – Am I allowed? how to get the best from your pregnancy, birth and postnatal care experiences.

Thursday 5th December – Blissful, ecstatic or orgasmic birth?

Please phone or text 07939247462 prior to attending the meeting to confirm date and location details. I am a practicing midwife so there is a chance I would have to reschedule a meeting if attending a birth.

Please note that although children are welcome they are your responsibility at all times, as I do have free-roaming teenagers, lurcher and elderly cats.

The Association of Radical Midwives are midwives, student midwives and others in the UK committed to improving the maternity care provided by the NHS. We strongly believe that all women have the right to a service tailored more closely to their needs, and a sympathetic attitude on the part of their professional attendants.

We are primarily a support group for people having difficulty in getting or giving  sympathetic, personalised midwifery care, and those who wish to provide good care. A few of us are working independently outside the NHS, in order to offer a more woman-centred,one-to-one, style of practice, which at present is not widely available within NHS maternity services.

In the mid 70s, the majority of pregnant women in UK had labour induced by artificial rupture of membranes (ARM) around the date they were “due”. These initials were used when the group needed a name, using the dictionary definition of “radical”, (roots, origins, basics, etc.) which aptly described the basic midwifery skills which they hoped to revive.

Held in our homes in Somerset, the group meet monthly to share skills and knowlege to empower women to have the best possible maternity care experience. Phone me or e-mail me at joy@birthjoy.co.uk for details of the next meeting.

The Joy of birth

Has anyone ever told you that birth can be pleasurable or even pain free? It may be a very strange concept to women bombarded with stories of painful or traumatic birth. As an Independent midwife I rarely see women needing pharmacological pain relief, the main reasons being that they feel safe, loved and respected. They know and trust their midwife and know the sensations of labour are not to be feared. When a woman feels safe and supported throughout childbirth her biological functions can work as they were designed to. Her body produces complex coctails of hormones, endorphins and oxytocin to bring forth her baby in joy and triumph.

The strong sensations of childbirth are actually signs that our body is working well. The discomfort alerts us to the start of labour so we can move to a place of safety and gather our birth supporters around us. As the baby moves through our body it instructs us how, and when to move, to paricipate in the intimate dance of birth. As sensations change they let us know that we are making progress, and to assume a birthing position. The sensations of the expulsive stage enable us to work with our body and baby to give birth. These signals are more likely to be perceived as painful if the birthing woman is unsupported, scared, disturbed, or interferred with. Most women with good support manage labour with self-help techniques, love and their own determination.

I am of course referring to healthy women, experiencing full-term spontaneous labour, with a baby in the optimum position. If a labour is induced or augmented with artificial drugs, if a baby is in a really unusual position, or if an instrumental or surgical birth is necessary, then pain can be more difficult to manage.

The secret to an enjoyable birth experience is preparation, good labour support, and Oxytocin. Oxytocin has been called the love hormone as it is produced when we fall in love, or make love. It is very important in childbirth as it makes the uterus contract, enhances maternal behaviour and enables the letdown reflex in breastfeeding. Oxytocin is a very shy hormone though. It is hard to produce oxytocin in stressful situations.

The same environment which is conducive to making love is also advantageous in childbirth. Can you imagine having to make love in hospital, with bright lights, little or no privacy, unfamiliar staff wanting to watch, examine, time and chart every move? It would be very hard to mainain that loving feeling, let alone reach orgasm.

Oxytocin production is enhanced in an environment of trust, privacy, love, tenderness, darkness and emotional and physical comfort. As normal labour progresses it is normal for a woman to become more inwardly focussed, and less inclined to commumicate. The thinking parts of her brain need to not be stimulated as she enters a different state, sometimes referred to as being in “labourland.” If a woman is disturbed during active labour the flow of oxytocin can be interrupted.

According to wikipedia “The word oxytocin was derived from Greek  oxys, and tokos, meaning “quick birth,” so you can see its advantages!

Of course, if medical management is really necessary it is still possible to give birth in joy. Loving support, being in charge of the decision making process and sending love to your baby throughout, can make all the difference.

See the films below to see how joyful birth can be.

 

French woman enjoying giving birth – one of the best films of enjoyable birth I’ve ever seen.

Ecstatic birth –  shows the heights of pleasure some women can experience in labour.

Elephant birth – rather dramatic but worth watching just to see the power of birth and maternal instinct. Continue reading The Joy of birth