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The Third International Breech Birth Conference. Washington DC November 2012

Robin Guy
Heads Up breech birth conference

I was lucky enough to be invited to lead a workshop at this years International Breech birth conference.

My qualifications are that I have been lucky to work with Breech birth expert Mary Cronk MBE as an Independent midwife. We attended several breech births together and thus I started to learn breech birth skills. Our midwifery clients alowed us to take photos of their births for teaching purposes, and these have further added to our knowledge as we studied the many and varied ways breech babies are born.

My workshop was entitled “Arse Backwards” as my journey to learning breech birth skills started with the most unusual births. A double footling, a foot then knee, a foot and extended leg, VBAC breech birth – all at home, were marvelous to attend and record, to share with other health professionals and women expecting breech presenting babies. Unfortunately I do not have permission to share these photos on-line which is why Mary Cronk and I travel the country (and abroad) sharing the stories and skills of breech birth.

My presentation told the story of how I learnt breechbirth skills, and how important it is to share these skills with others, to give women the option of skilled birth attendants at their breech birth. I took along video footage of Mary Cronk sharing her wisdom which was very well received.

I also learnt a tremendous amount at this conference which will aid me in the future care of women planning spontaneous breech birth.

I hope to have time to write up the highlights, but until then check out the brilliant Rixa Freeze’s blog

MAMA Conference 26th and 27th April 2012

Birth Joy (C) 2011

I have just returned from the fabulous MAMA Conference in Troon, Scotland, organised by the brilliant Cassie MacNamara.

Mary Cronk MBE had been booked as a speaker but had recently suffered a bereavement, and asked me to talk on her behalf about breech birth. These are big shoes to fill! I decided I could not teach about breech birth, but could provide a presentation paying Homage to all I’ve learnt from my mentor,  and great friend Mary Cronk.

With Knees shaking and voice quaking I took to the stage. It was an emotional moment as I knew I was only there because my learned colleague was at a funeral that very same day. I paid Homage to my mentor by showing photos of breech births which have been kindly shared by families who’ve births we’ve attended. Each breech birth taught me more and more about the skills needed to safely attend breech births. I hope Mary’s wisdom and teachings shone through my presentation. It was certainly well received!

Mary Cronk MBE (right) and Joy Horner (left) 2011

Here is some of the feedback I’ve received:

Met you at the conference, and was very inspired by all you shared with us on your breech experiences!”.

It was so wonderful to hear you speak at the MAMA conference. It really was incredibly inspiring and I just know Mary would have been so proud of she could have seen you speak. Many thanks for sharing your wisdom.”

Joy I would like to send my congratulations on yesterday’s presentation. You did Mary proud, and yourself, and I am sure that you will effect change in the NHS, they are very lucky to have you!”

I must have done something right as the organisers have invited me back next year!

The highlight for me was sharing the stories privately with the wonderful Ina May Gaskin. What a privilege to speak on Mary Cronk’s behalf, and to be able to discuss breech birth with Ina May Gaskin.

Ina May Gaskin and Joy Horner 2012
 

 


The Joy of birth

Has anyone ever told you that birth can be pleasurable or even pain free? It may be a very strange concept to women bombarded with stories of painful or traumatic birth. As an Independent midwife I rarely see women needing pharmacological pain relief, the main reasons being that they feel safe, loved and respected. They know and trust their midwife and know the sensations of labour are not to be feared. When a woman feels safe and supported throughout childbirth her biological functions can work as they were designed to. Her body produces complex coctails of hormones, endorphins and oxytocin to bring forth her baby in joy and triumph.

The strong sensations of childbirth are actually signs that our body is working well. The discomfort alerts us to the start of labour so we can move to a place of safety and gather our birth supporters around us. As the baby moves through our body it instructs us how, and when to move, to paricipate in the intimate dance of birth. As sensations change they let us know that we are making progress, and to assume a birthing position. The sensations of the expulsive stage enable us to work with our body and baby to give birth. These signals are more likely to be perceived as painful if the birthing woman is unsupported, scared, disturbed, or interferred with. Most women with good support manage labour with self-help techniques, love and their own determination.

I am of course referring to healthy women, experiencing full-term spontaneous labour, with a baby in the optimum position. If a labour is induced or augmented with artificial drugs, if a baby is in a really unusual position, or if an instrumental or surgical birth is necessary, then pain can be more difficult to manage.

The secret to an enjoyable birth experience is preparation, good labour support, and Oxytocin. Oxytocin has been called the love hormone as it is produced when we fall in love, or make love. It is very important in childbirth as it makes the uterus contract, enhances maternal behaviour and enables the letdown reflex in breastfeeding. Oxytocin is a very shy hormone though. It is hard to produce oxytocin in stressful situations.

The same environment which is conducive to making love is also advantageous in childbirth. Can you imagine having to make love in hospital, with bright lights, little or no privacy, unfamiliar staff wanting to watch, examine, time and chart every move? It would be very hard to mainain that loving feeling, let alone reach orgasm.

Oxytocin production is enhanced in an environment of trust, privacy, love, tenderness, darkness and emotional and physical comfort. As normal labour progresses it is normal for a woman to become more inwardly focussed, and less inclined to commumicate. The thinking parts of her brain need to not be stimulated as she enters a different state, sometimes referred to as being in “labourland.” If a woman is disturbed during active labour the flow of oxytocin can be interrupted.

According to wikipedia “The word oxytocin was derived from Greek  oxys, and tokos, meaning “quick birth,” so you can see its advantages!

Of course, if medical management is really necessary it is still possible to give birth in joy. Loving support, being in charge of the decision making process and sending love to your baby throughout, can make all the difference.

See the films below to see how joyful birth can be.

 

French woman enjoying giving birth – one of the best films of enjoyable birth I’ve ever seen.

Ecstatic birth –  shows the heights of pleasure some women can experience in labour.

Elephant birth – rather dramatic but worth watching just to see the power of birth and maternal instinct. Continue reading The Joy of birth