Tag Archives: teaching

Birthing from Within Birth Preparation Weekend

bfw prenatal classes

 

 

Saturday 18th and Sunday 19th April 2015  In Glastonbury

I am so pleased to be once again running this popular workshop in Glastonbury with my partner Jady Mountjoy. Working with stories, art and practical techniques this 2 day workshop will prepare you for your journey to parenthood.

  • Prepare for birth as a Rite of Passage.
  • Understand the power and life-long impact that “birthing from within” offers all participants in birth.
  • Co-create holistic prenatal care that is informative, transformative, and builds a foundation for birthing in awareness in our birth culture, whatever the birth location or outcome or events of the birth.
  • Prevent or minimize emotionally difficult births (for parents and professionals) through compassionate, honest preparation.
  • Honour and use the power of Birth Story telling and listening.

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Held in studio of the innovative Red Brick Building, Morelands enterprise Park, Glastonbury, BA69FT directions here

The cost of our workshop is £70 per person or £130 per couple. There are concessions if unwaged. 

 

I first learnt about birthing from within when I bought Pam England’s book and was so impressed that I signed up to train as a birthing from with mentor.

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  • Childbirth is a profound rite of passage, not a medical event (even when medical care is part of the birth).
  • The essence of childbirth preparation is self-discovery, not assimilating obstetric information. The teacher (mentor) is “midwife” to the parents’ discovery process, not the expert from whom wisdom flows.
  • Childbirth preparation is a continually evolving process (for parents and teachers), not a static structure of techniques and knowledge.
  • Parents’ individual needs and differences help determine class content.
  • Active, creative self-expression is critical to childbirth preparation.
  • The purpose of childbirth preparation is to prepare mothers to give birth-in-awareness, not to achieve a specific birth outcome.
  • Pregnancy and birth outcome are influenced by a variety of factors, but can’t be controlled by planning.
  • In order to help parents mobilize their coping resources, it is critical for childbirth classes to acknowledge that unexpected, unwelcome events may happen during labour.
  • Parents deserve support for any birth option which might be right for them (whether it be drugs, caesarean, home birth, or bottle-feeding).
  • Pain is an inevitable part of childbirth, yet much can be done to ease suffering.
  • Pain-coping practices work best when integrated into daily life, rather than “dusted off” for labour.
  • Fathers and birth partners help best as birth guardians or loving partners, not as coaches; they also need support.
  • For parents, pregnancy, birth, and postpartum is a time of continuous learning and adjustment; holistic support and education should be available throughout that period.
  • Childbirth preparation is also parent preparation.

To book your place please contact me on 07939247462 or email joy@birthjoy.co.uk.

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Mary Cronk’s Assertiveness Phrases

Following on from my “Am I Allowed post” I phoned my dear friend and former colleague Mary Cronk. As well as a good chat with each other, I obtained her permission to post her assertiveness phrases. She re-quoted the phrases that I know by heart, and have recommended to many women. I had the pleasure of working with Mary Cronk for 5 years as an Independent Midwife, and a further 2 as co-teacher of “Once More Unto The Breech” workshops. She is a true Midwife and has spent her life helping women achieve positive birth experiences.

joy and mary307710_251788671525311_932911360_nMary Cronk is an expert in breech birth who has shared the skills of breech birth with midwives and doctors across the United kingdom. She was awarded a MBE for her services to women.

See Mary in action here: Mary

You may find these phrases useful, particularly if told that you are “not allowed” to have your baby at home, or you “have to” be induced, etc.

“I am sure that many others will explain your absolute right to refuse any procedure for any or no reason. The law, and good practice is quite clear. A sensible person will listen carefully to any explanations to why a procedure is proposed, and then should she choose not to have XY or Z she just says no or no thank you. The “allowing” is done by YOU. An asssertive approach is worth cultivating. You may care to commit the following phrases to memory and practice them frequently in front of a mirror. Continue reading Mary Cronk’s Assertiveness Phrases

The Third International Breech Birth Conference. Washington DC November 2012

Robin Guy
Heads Up breech birth conference

I was lucky enough to be invited to lead a workshop at this years International Breech birth conference.

My qualifications are that I have been lucky to work with Breech birth expert Mary Cronk MBE as an Independent midwife. We attended several breech births together and thus I started to learn breech birth skills. Our midwifery clients alowed us to take photos of their births for teaching purposes, and these have further added to our knowledge as we studied the many and varied ways breech babies are born.

My workshop was entitled “Arse Backwards” as my journey to learning breech birth skills started with the most unusual births. A double footling, a foot then knee, a foot and extended leg, VBAC breech birth – all at home, were marvelous to attend and record, to share with other health professionals and women expecting breech presenting babies. Unfortunately I do not have permission to share these photos on-line which is why Mary Cronk and I travel the country (and abroad) sharing the stories and skills of breech birth.

My presentation told the story of how I learnt breechbirth skills, and how important it is to share these skills with others, to give women the option of skilled birth attendants at their breech birth. I took along video footage of Mary Cronk sharing her wisdom which was very well received.

I also learnt a tremendous amount at this conference which will aid me in the future care of women planning spontaneous breech birth.

I hope to have time to write up the highlights, but until then check out the brilliant Rixa Freeze’s blog

Association of Radical Midwives monthly discussion group.

This is a local group for the support of peaceful pregnancy, birth and parenting. Hosted by Joy Horner, radical midwife, mum, lecturer and some day writer. Inspired by the Freedom For Birth film I am determined to impart information about human rights in childbirth, facilitate discussions, and to support women on their journeys to parenthood. You don’t have to be a midwife, a radical, or a female to attend. All those with an interested in women’s rights and experiences in pregnancy and childbirth are welcomed. These stimulating monthly discussion groups are designed to encourage experience sharing and debate, accompanied by tea and cake. All welcome. Donations for refreshments welcomed as 50% given to local charity Towards Tomorrow Together.

2013 Meetings at my house 7:30pm-9:30pm:

Thursday 8th August – Birth rights and choices.

Tuessday 3rd September – Waterbirth evening.

Thursday 3rd October – Postponed due to midwifery commitments.

Thursday 7th November – Am I allowed? how to get the best from your pregnancy, birth and postnatal care experiences.

Thursday 5th December – Blissful, ecstatic or orgasmic birth?

Please phone or text 07939247462 prior to attending the meeting to confirm date and location details. I am a practicing midwife so there is a chance I would have to reschedule a meeting if attending a birth.

Please note that although children are welcome they are your responsibility at all times, as I do have free-roaming teenagers, lurcher and elderly cats.

The Association of Radical Midwives are midwives, student midwives and others in the UK committed to improving the maternity care provided by the NHS. We strongly believe that all women have the right to a service tailored more closely to their needs, and a sympathetic attitude on the part of their professional attendants.

We are primarily a support group for people having difficulty in getting or giving  sympathetic, personalised midwifery care, and those who wish to provide good care. A few of us are working independently outside the NHS, in order to offer a more woman-centred,one-to-one, style of practice, which at present is not widely available within NHS maternity services.

In the mid 70s, the majority of pregnant women in UK had labour induced by artificial rupture of membranes (ARM) around the date they were “due”. These initials were used when the group needed a name, using the dictionary definition of “radical”, (roots, origins, basics, etc.) which aptly described the basic midwifery skills which they hoped to revive.

Held in our homes in Somerset, the group meet monthly to share skills and knowlege to empower women to have the best possible maternity care experience. Phone me or e-mail me at joy@birthjoy.co.uk for details of the next meeting.

MAMA Conference 26th and 27th April 2012

Birth Joy (C) 2011

I have just returned from the fabulous MAMA Conference in Troon, Scotland, organised by the brilliant Cassie MacNamara.

Mary Cronk MBE had been booked as a speaker but had recently suffered a bereavement, and asked me to talk on her behalf about breech birth. These are big shoes to fill! I decided I could not teach about breech birth, but could provide a presentation paying Homage to all I’ve learnt from my mentor,  and great friend Mary Cronk.

With Knees shaking and voice quaking I took to the stage. It was an emotional moment as I knew I was only there because my learned colleague was at a funeral that very same day. I paid Homage to my mentor by showing photos of breech births which have been kindly shared by families who’ve births we’ve attended. Each breech birth taught me more and more about the skills needed to safely attend breech births. I hope Mary’s wisdom and teachings shone through my presentation. It was certainly well received!

Mary Cronk MBE (right) and Joy Horner (left) 2011

Here is some of the feedback I’ve received:

Met you at the conference, and was very inspired by all you shared with us on your breech experiences!”.

It was so wonderful to hear you speak at the MAMA conference. It really was incredibly inspiring and I just know Mary would have been so proud of she could have seen you speak. Many thanks for sharing your wisdom.”

Joy I would like to send my congratulations on yesterday’s presentation. You did Mary proud, and yourself, and I am sure that you will effect change in the NHS, they are very lucky to have you!”

I must have done something right as the organisers have invited me back next year!

The highlight for me was sharing the stories privately with the wonderful Ina May Gaskin. What a privilege to speak on Mary Cronk’s behalf, and to be able to discuss breech birth with Ina May Gaskin.

Ina May Gaskin and Joy Horner 2012
 

 


The Joy of birth

Has anyone ever told you that birth can be pleasurable or even pain free? It may be a very strange concept to women bombarded with stories of painful or traumatic birth. As an Independent midwife I rarely see women needing pharmacological pain relief, the main reasons being that they feel safe, loved and respected. They know and trust their midwife and know the sensations of labour are not to be feared. When a woman feels safe and supported throughout childbirth her biological functions can work as they were designed to. Her body produces complex coctails of hormones, endorphins and oxytocin to bring forth her baby in joy and triumph.

The strong sensations of childbirth are actually signs that our body is working well. The discomfort alerts us to the start of labour so we can move to a place of safety and gather our birth supporters around us. As the baby moves through our body it instructs us how, and when to move, to paricipate in the intimate dance of birth. As sensations change they let us know that we are making progress, and to assume a birthing position. The sensations of the expulsive stage enable us to work with our body and baby to give birth. These signals are more likely to be perceived as painful if the birthing woman is unsupported, scared, disturbed, or interferred with. Most women with good support manage labour with self-help techniques, love and their own determination.

I am of course referring to healthy women, experiencing full-term spontaneous labour, with a baby in the optimum position. If a labour is induced or augmented with artificial drugs, if a baby is in a really unusual position, or if an instrumental or surgical birth is necessary, then pain can be more difficult to manage.

The secret to an enjoyable birth experience is preparation, good labour support, and Oxytocin. Oxytocin has been called the love hormone as it is produced when we fall in love, or make love. It is very important in childbirth as it makes the uterus contract, enhances maternal behaviour and enables the letdown reflex in breastfeeding. Oxytocin is a very shy hormone though. It is hard to produce oxytocin in stressful situations.

The same environment which is conducive to making love is also advantageous in childbirth. Can you imagine having to make love in hospital, with bright lights, little or no privacy, unfamiliar staff wanting to watch, examine, time and chart every move? It would be very hard to mainain that loving feeling, let alone reach orgasm.

Oxytocin production is enhanced in an environment of trust, privacy, love, tenderness, darkness and emotional and physical comfort. As normal labour progresses it is normal for a woman to become more inwardly focussed, and less inclined to commumicate. The thinking parts of her brain need to not be stimulated as she enters a different state, sometimes referred to as being in “labourland.” If a woman is disturbed during active labour the flow of oxytocin can be interrupted.

According to wikipedia “The word oxytocin was derived from Greek  oxys, and tokos, meaning “quick birth,” so you can see its advantages!

Of course, if medical management is really necessary it is still possible to give birth in joy. Loving support, being in charge of the decision making process and sending love to your baby throughout, can make all the difference.

See the films below to see how joyful birth can be.

 

French woman enjoying giving birth – one of the best films of enjoyable birth I’ve ever seen.

Ecstatic birth –  shows the heights of pleasure some women can experience in labour.

Elephant birth – rather dramatic but worth watching just to see the power of birth and maternal instinct. Continue reading The Joy of birth

Copyright and the sharing of information

After an awkward issue arose between some midwifery colleagues over use of each other’s materials without consent I was prompted to write this page.

I believe all information is knowledge, knowledge is power and therefore should be shared to empower women. All information contained in this blog is my original work, from knowledge amassed throughout my midwifery career. I have worked very hard and am proud of the work I have done, so have marked photos, artwork and text as copyright Birth Joy Ltd(c). When I have used someone else’s material I will credit them in the text. I respectfully request that you do likewise. Please pass on information from my website but please remember to quote the origins of your information out of respect.

Photos are copyright to the photographer. I am very lucky that when I’ve taken birth photos, some women have given me permission to use these for teaching purposes, others have let me use their photos on my website. Some have allowed me to share with other midwives and one allowed publication in a midwifery text book. Many women have not, and I respect their right to do so.

For more information on copyright see this useful website.

Breech Birth

Breech birthBreech birth is a very complex subject which needs in depth discussion with your care provider. I am lucky to have worked with one of the UK’s most experienced breech birth midwives, Mary Cronk, learning what I can about these unusual, but not abnormal  presentations. I have attended several breech births and taught alongside Mary Cronk, and Shawn Walker. I am happy to provide information and birth support for those carrying a breech presenting baby.

The Breech Birth Network run study days for health professionals and others wishing to learn more about spontaneous breech birth. This is a different set of skills to those needed to “Deliver” a breech baby which is a hands-on medical technique. Spontaneous breech birth is a hands off birth which can be facilitated by experienced midwives. The Royal College of Midwives consider this a normal type of birth.

Although breech is a normal presentation it carries additional risks compared with a head down birth. Breech babies are often born swiftly and spontaneously, but sometimes manouvers or surgery are needed to ensure baby is born safely. For this reason I recommend hospital birth with experienced care providers for breech presenting babies.

There are many things you can do to encourage a breech baby to turn see the brilliant spinning babies  website or the very funny pregnant chicken blog. The majority of babies who present as breech in pregnancy will turn head down by 36/37 weeks. If baby has not turned by 36/37 weeks of pregnancy you may be offered an External Cephalic Version (ECV) in hospital.

This ECV video  shows the technique used. The success rates (aprox 50%) vary with practitioner, whether it is your first baby, type of breech, how much fluid, size of baby etc. There is a small risk (1 in 200) of the baby becoming distressed during the procedure and needing immediate delivery by caesarean. More information is available here.

Breech babies can of course be born vaginally, but some doctors recommend caesarean surgery to deliver breech babies. Those doctors are probably basing their recommendation on the flawed Hannah trial (also called the Term Breech Trial or TBT) results. The TBT study seemed to indicate that babies born vaginally had worse outcomes than those born by caesarean, but when the outcomes were looked at 2 years later there were no differences in outcomes for the babies, but there are differences for the mother recovering from abdominal surgery. There have been many studies since, such as the PREMODA study (reported on at the 2012 breech birth conference) which show no differences in outcomes for breech babies born vaginally or by caesarean section. It is very important that you have a skilled midwife or doctor caring for you whichever type of birth you have.

The information and criteria which doctors use to determine who is a good candidate for sucessful vaginal birth can be found here. Please bear in mind that this green top guideline was published in 2006 and there has been lots of research done since then! I attended the International Breech Birth Conference in Washington DC in November 2012 and am eagerly awaiting the data soon to be published by Dr Frank Louven and his team in Frankfurt. See more information from the conference in Dr Rixa Freeze’s fantastic blog here.

See beautiful breech birth videos here:

A first baby born Frank Breech at home. Attended by a gentle doctor, this is a good illustration of spontaneous breech birth. The doctor does use a manouvre to help the baby’s head be born, and the baby doesn’t breathe immediately (this is fairly typical of breech born babies). You will notice how the doctor wisely does not cut the umbilical cord and how baby just requires stimulation to start breathing within a minute. Click here

A wonderful video of breech birth at home in water. It is the woman’s 4th baby and I can’t help wondering if baby would have got herself out sooner if the mother was in the supine position so buoyancy would have lifted baby’s body? The reverse of dry land breech birth, when the mother is on all fours and the baby descends aided by gravity. Anyway it’s a beautiful birth and a lesson to midwives that babies play an active part in the birth process.  You tube beautiful breech waterbirth

Another you tube film of planned breech birth at home clearly illustrating baby lifting her legs to flex her head (necessary for birth of the aftercoming head). It also shows how quickly breech babies can be born (this is the woman’s third baby), the midwife makes a very good catch of this little one! click on link Breech homebirth

There is also a lovely DVD you can buy which tells one woman’s story of deciding which birth was right for her and her baby. its called A Breech in The System. See the trailer here  and order your copy here

Of course I’m not saying all babies can, or should be born vaginally, but many can, and women should be given balanced information so they can make informed decisions about their care.

Da a Luz

Vanessa Brooks at Buddafields 2011

Just returned from a wonderful week in Spain. I met the wonderful Vanessa Brooks for the first time this year, and offered to share my experiences of breech births with her in Spain.

Unfortunately I was only able to spend 24hrs at the Midwives Rock workshop, as my family had accompanied me and were eager to do other holiday activities.
I taught at Da a Luz for 5 hours on the Saturday. I shared my experiences and knowledge that breech birth is unusual but not abnormal, and breech babies can be born vaginally as well as by caesarean. Although Breech birth is a variation of the normal I also taught that breech birth carries some additional risks for the baby however he is born, so careful monitoring of the progress of labour and baby’s well-being is essential.
It was a real pleasure to work with Vanessa and to meet Adela Stockton and all the other wonderful birth workers.
I look forward to teaching with Vanessa again in June 2012 in Brighton UK.

Had a wonderfully nourishing time with Vanessa and other like-minded birth workers in the summer of 2012! We talked about birth of the placenta, control of bleeding, orgasmic birth and so much more. Then it was my turn to contribute alongside Marta Orbis and Vanessa Brooks teaching about breech births and difficult births. Can’t wait to work with Vanessa again next year. xxx